miércoles, 17 de octubre de 2012

Spectral biomimetic technique for wood classification inspired by human echolocation

Palatal clicks are most interesting for human echolocation. Moreover, these sounds are suitable for other acoustic applications due to their regular mathematical properties and reproducibility. Simple and nondestructive techniques, bioinspired by synthetized pulses whose form reproduces the best features of palatal clicks, can be developed. The use of synthetic palatal pulses also allows detailed studies of the real possibilities of acoustic human echolocation without the problems associated with subjective individual differences. These techniques are being applied to the study of wood. As an example, a comparison of the performance of both natural and synthetic human echolocation to identify three different species of wood is presented. The results show that human echolocation has a vast potential. © 2012 Juan Antonio Martínez Rojas et al.


2012, Article number378361

Spectral biomimetic technique for wood classification inspired by human echolocation

a  Department of Signal Theory and Communications, Universidad de Alcalá, Campus Universitario, Ctra. de Madrid-Barcelona, km 33.600, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Spain
b  Department of Forest Economy and Management, E.T.S.I. de Montes, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain

Abstract

Palatal clicks are most interesting for human echolocation. Moreover, these sounds are suitable for other acoustic applications due to their regular mathematical properties and reproducibility. Simple and nondestructive techniques, bioinspired by synthetized pulses whose form reproduces the best features of palatal clicks, can be developed. The use of synthetic palatal pulses also allows detailed studies of the real possibilities of acoustic human echolocation without the problems associated with subjective individual differences. These techniques are being applied to the study of wood. As an example, a comparison of the performance of both natural and synthetic human echolocation to identify three different species of wood is presented. The results show that human echolocation has a vast potential. © 2012 Juan Antonio Martínez Rojas et al.
ISSN: 16876261Source Type: Journal Original language: English
DOI: 10.1155/2012/378361Document Type: Article
  Martínez Rojas, J.A.; Department of Signal Theory and Communications, Universidad de Alcalá, Campus Universitario, Ctra. de Madrid-Barcelona, km 33.600, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Spain; email:juanan.martinez@uah.es 

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