lunes, 1 de noviembre de 2010

virgin GLOBAL science

global warming Look up global warming at Dictionary.com
by 1983 as the name for overall rising temperatures and attendant consequences as a result of human activity. Originally theoretical, popularized as a reality from 1989.
global Look up global at Dictionary.com
1670s, “spherical,” from globe + -al (1). Meaning “worldwide, universal” is from 1892. Related: globally. Global village first attested 1960, popularized, if not coined, by Canadian educator Marshall McLuhan (1911-80).
Postliterate man's electronic media contract the world to a village or tribe where everything happens to everyone at the same time: everyone knows about, and therefore participates in, everything that is happening the minute it happens. Television gives this quality of simultaneity to events in the global village. [Carpenter & McLuhan, "Explorations in Communication," 1960]
globalization Look up globalization at Dictionary.com
1961, from globalize, which is attested at least from 1953 in various senses; the main modern one, with reference to global economic systems, emerged 1959.
escalation Look up escalation at Dictionary.com
derived noun from escalate; in the figurative sense it is from 1938, in reference to the battleship arms race among global military powers.
Beatles Look up Beatles at Dictionary.com
seminal rock and pop group formed in Liverpool, England; named as such 1960 (after a succession of other names), supposedly by then-bassist Stuart Sutcliffe, from beetles (on model of Buddy Holly's band The Crickets) with a pun on the musical sense of beat. Their global popularity dates to 1963.
globalism Look up globalism at Dictionary.com
1961, from global + -ism.
climate change Look up climate change at Dictionary.com
1983, in the modern "global warming" sense, from climate + change.
cholera Look up cholera at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "choler, bile, melancholy," from L.L. cholera, from Gk. kholera "a type of disease characterized by diarrhea, supposedly caused by choler" (Celsus), from khole "gall, bile," from khloazein "to be green," from khloros (see Chloe). But another sense of khole was "drainpipe, gutter." Revived 1560s as a name for a severe digestive disorder (rarely fatal to adults); and 1704 (especially as cholera morbus), for a highly lethal disease endemic in India, periodically breaking out in global epidemics.

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada

yesyukan