sábado, 7 de agosto de 2010

Sociobiology of Communication

Sociobiology of Communication
an interdisciplinary perspective
d'Ettorre, Patrizia (Editor), Centre for Social Evolution, University of Copenhagen
Hughes, David P. (Editor), Centre for Social Evolution, Universtiy of Copenhagen
Print publication date: 2008
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008
Print ISBN-13: 978-0-19-921684-0
doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216840.001.0001


Abstract: Communication is the cornerstone of socially interacting groups. This is self-evident for human societies but not for bacterial biofilms, and super-colonies that span whole continents and transoceanic communication among whales. Since the early beginnings of communication studies, it has always been a stated goal to identify common features of diverse forms of communication (recently also including the internet), but syntheses have been few and historical barriers between sub-disciplines of molecular, evolutionary, chemical, and behavioural biology have been prohibitive stumbling blocks. This book brings together a highly-respected group of authors from a diverse range of fields in biology and beyond, in an attempt to synthesize current understanding of the evolutionary principles of communication, and to identify and explore key directions that will likely be pursued in the coming years. Contributions range from molecular microbiologists untangling the genetic basis of bacterial communication, to behavioural ecologists determining the scope of communication networks among colonial vertebrates. In addition, there are important contributions from theoretical biology (genomic conflict and self organisation), the humanities (linguistics and philosophy), and evolutionary psychology (human mate choice and the evolution of human societies). The book asks — and tentatively answers with some degree of confidence — what the general principles of social communication are.

Keywords: interdisciplinary approach, evolutionary biology, signals, self organization, evolution of societies, bacterial biofilms, super-colonies, whales
Table of Contents
Preface
You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 1. The handicap principle and signalling in collaborative systems
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 2. Communication in bacteria
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 3. Communication in social networks of territorial animals: networking at different levels in birds and other systems
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 4. Communication between hosts and social parasites
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 5. Chemical communication and the coordination of social interactions in insects
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 6. Chemical communication in societies of rodents
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 7. Neurobiology of olfactory communication in the honeybee
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 8. Rapid evolution and sexual signals
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 9. Communication of mate quality in humans
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 10. The extended phenotype within the colony and how it obscures social communication
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 11. Synergy in social communication
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 12. Conflicting messages: genomic imprinting and internal communication
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 13. Language unbound: genomic conflict and psychosis in the origin of modern humans
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 14. The evolution of human communication and language
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 15. Why teach? The evolutionary origins and ecological consequences of costly information transfer
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
CHAPTER 16. Grades of communication
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
Concluding remarks
You have access to the abstract and full text for this item. You have access to the full text for this item.
Index
You have access to the full text for this item.


doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216840.001.0001

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada

yesyukan